Tag archives for First Drives

2012 Tesla Model S: First Drive Video

Related Photo Galleries



See more photos »

With Tesla Motors opening new Tesla Stores at a rapid pace, the 2012 Tesla Model S all-electric sport sedan has now been seen by hundreds of thousands of people.

Thus far, however, very few of them, however, have gotten behind the wheel.

Tesla’s working to change that, with a traveling nationwide roadshow from now through early August that aims to put 5,000 Model S reservation holders in the driver’s seat for a few minutes each.

Yesterday, we got our first test drive of the 2012 Tesla Model S. The video above should give you a small taste of what our drive was like.

We really had only about 20 or 25 minutes behind the wheel of the new electric luxury sedan from Silicon Valley startup carmaker Tesla Motors [NSDQ:TSLA], but it gave us a little taste of what owners will start to experience as Model S deliveries slowly ramp up.

The car is quiet, quick–especially the high-end Model S Signature Series Performance model we drove–and smooth.

The 17-inch central touchscreen display is astounding–see a photo gallery of display screenshots here–and easy to use but not distracting.

And with some light jazz playing as we tooled around lower Manhattan, we came to the preliminary conclusion that indeed the 2012 Tesla Model S is a viable car.

It’s also fun to drive, and unlike the crude, cramped Roadster–hellaciously fun in its own way, but not all that practical–we can easily imagine using it as a daily vehicle.

If, that is, we had the cash to cover the sticker price, which on our top-end test car was somewhere around $100,000.

If you’re all about the acceleration, there’s a bit at 0:40 and another burst at 2:30. But watch the whole thing to see the touchscreen and a lot more.

There’s one narration error: At the very end, “2010 Tesla Model S” should obviously be 2012. Sorry ’bout that.

Special thanks to our pal Noonz, who cheerfully let himself be pressed into service as cameraman.

+++++++++++

By John Voelcker

2012 Tesla Model S: First Drive Of All-Electric Sport Sedan

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

HI-RES GALLERY: 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

After an hour in a 2012 Tesla Model S all-electric sport sedan, one thing became clear: It’s a viable car.

The Model S gives Tesla Motors a shot at turning into a real car company.

That’s a provisional judgment; as many journalists have noted, 10-minute drives or an hour driving and riding in limited New York City traffic hardly provides the time or mixed conditions for a proper review.

But the Model S can make the case for electric cars in a way that the odd-looking Nissan Leaf or the politically controversial Chevy Volt never will.

It’s good-looking, in a Jaguar vein. The performance of the top-end Model S Signature Series Performance model we drove was quietly spectacular.

We saw no major quality flaws or obvious manufacturing defects (unlike the 2012 Fisker Karma we tested earlier this year).

And with EPA-rated range of 265 miles and an 89-MPGe efficiency rating, the Model S should eliminate any trace of range anxiety for regular daily use (outside of long road trips).

So the 2012 Tesla Model S sedan is about as promising a new product as the industry has seen for many years.

Now Tesla Motors [NSDQ:TSLA] has to get the car into volume production, fill the portion of almost 11,000 reservations that turn into paid orders–and generate enough cash to do all that plus develop its next models.

Sleek but not radical styling

If you’re going to echo a luxury-car shape, you could do considerably worse than the profile of the Jaguar XF and XJ. Those were by far the most common comparisons from journalists and passers-by at this morning’s Tesla event.

The proportions of the Model S are those of its competitors–the BMW 5-Series, the Mercedes-Benz E-Class, the Audi A6, and the Jaguar XF–though with a slightly longer wheelbase and shorter rear overhang.

Overall, the Model S isn’t as noticeable on the street as the Tesla Roadster or the low, swoopy, curvaceous Fisker Karma. But it’s also far more practical than either of those cars.

Deceptively fast

Tesla made its mark with the Roadster sports car. It was a crude, basic, all-electric open two-seater whose sins could be forgiven because its stunning performance was so addictive.

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

Embarrassing some supercars costing twice its $109,000 base price, the Roadster knocked off 0-to-60-mph times of less than 4 seconds, courtesy of a 53-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack and a 175-kilowatt (248-hp) electric motor powering the rear wheels.

The 2012 Tesla Model S has a larger battery pack that forms the floorpan of its all-new design, but its 270-kW (362-hp) motor still powers the rear wheels. The Performance model has a more powerful 301-kW (416-hp) motor.

With a weight of about 4,700 pounds (a ton heavier than a Roadster), the Model S feels quite different behind the wheel than the attack-jet Roadster.

The Performance model we drove, with higher-spec power electronics and other modifications, is quoted at a 4.4-second 0-to-60-mph time (the standard Model S is quoted at 5.6 seconds).

We couldn’t test acceleration times, but the Performance edition certainly offered the ability to surge swiftly away from any other vehicle on Manhattan’s West Side Highway (sadly, we encountered no supercars).

Acceleration vs range

The deceptive part is that the Model S is so calm and quiet inside that there’s virtually no mechanical noise on acceleration. Tire noise is obvious with the stereo off, and then wind noise kicks in above 40 mph or so.

Only once, on full acceleration from 0 to a high number, did we hear a high-pitched humming whine, presumably from the power electronics.

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

Just as in the Roadster, however, keeping your foot in the Tesla Model S will do a lot of damage to your range.

The car showed a maximum potential range of 290 miles on a fully charged battery, but based on the last 30 miles of driving, showed us a predicted range of 165 miles–meaning owners will rapidly learn to trade off the sheer fun of acceleration for longer range.

Air suspension

The air suspension provides ride quality that’s firm over small road imperfections, with a little more feedback transmitted than might be expected. We didn’t test the various suspension settings, including one that our Tesla minder candidly described as “mushy.”

Over the bad stuff, including the uneven, potholed, cobblestone streets of Manhattan’s West Village, the Model S rode superbly. 


2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

In the Tesla Model S, you can easily find yourself not only pulling away from traffic, but traveling 20 mph over the speed limit. And as in the Roadster, at least in the Model S Performance model, you’ll want to do it again and again and again.

Michael Sexton, who runs the Tesla Store in Manhattan, says that it took him about six months before he stopped using his Roadster that way and just drove it–knowing that he had sheer acceleration on tap when he wanted it.

Less regen than Roadster

Smooth but aggressive regenerative braking was a hallmark of the Tesla Roadster. There are only two settings for regenerative braking–Normal and Low–in the Model S, and the (highest) Normal setting felt less aggressive.

Experienced electric-car drivers often prefer “one-pedal driving,” planning ahead enough to use solely regenerative braking to slow down almost to a stop. That’s not quite as easy in the Model S, since its weight gives it more rolling momentum.

But the new and much larger pool of tech-oriented luxury car buyers who will consider the Model S (Tesla hopes) are likely to want it to drive in a familiar fashion, like an automatic BMW or Audi sedan. In that, Tesla’s new sedan succeeds.

The handling inspires confidence, with an obviously low center of gravity, but the Model S is a little heavier-feeling than we’d expected. It was more like the Mercedes-Benz S-Class we recently tested than the last BMW 5-Series we drove a couple of years ago.

And we look forward to the head-to-head comparison tests that traditional auto magazines are likely to do whenever they can get a Model S for more than an hour at a time.

Big fast touchscreen a generation ahead

Sitting behind the wheel, the driver sees three control stalks on the left and one on the right, all seemingly identical to those in Mercedes-Benz cars.

The two on the left are an upper cruise control and a lower turn signal, meaning that Model S drivers will try to signal with the cruise lever until they retrain themselves, just as in a Benz. There’s also a tilt-and-telescope adjustment for the wheel.


2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

HI-RES GALLERY: 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012
  • 2012 Tesla Model S display screen [Photo: Flickr user jurvetson]
  • 2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

On the right, a drive selector offers simply D, R, and P, with an automatic parking brake built in, without any separate lever or switch for that. There’s a small amount of idle creep built in, mimicking an automatic transmission car.

[UPDATE: After speaking with Tesla the next day, we learned that we were wrong: There is no idle-creep built into Model S cars right now. We're baffled as to what we experienced; the only thing we can imagine is that we were on an almost imperceptible downward slope when stopped, and the car has such low rolling resistance that it began to roll. In any case, we apologize for the error.]

But by far the most noticeable feature of the Model S interior is the giant 17-inch touchscreen display that takes up the entire center stack. The instrument cluster behind the steering wheel is entirely a digital display too.

The brilliant graphics, instant response, and easy-to-learn control screens of the central display immediately relegate any other car’s system to second-class status. The Mercedes-Benz COMAND system, BMW’s notorious iDrive, the mass-market MyFordTouch, and others are instantly outdated and primitive.

We were initially skeptical about having such a big screen to control most functions in the Model S. And, to be fair, an hour is nowhere near enough time to put it through its paces. But based on early use, we may become converts.

And Tesla’s Silicon Valley roots show through in a high “surprise and delight” quotient in unexpected places.

Want to open the sunroof? Just swipe your finger along a plan view of the Model S, toward the rear. Or you can use a large slider to open it to any percentage you want.

Switch on a turn signal, and if you happen to be on the Lights screen, you’ll see it flashing brightly on a photo-realistic image of your car. Ditto the parking lamps, the headlights, and so on.

You can connect a portable storage device to play digital music through the Tesla’s stereo system, though such web apps as Pandora, Switcher, and Spotify aren’t yet implemented.

You can likely expect those soon, along with voice commands, which haven’t yet been activated.

Remarkably, there’s also full web browsing via the built-in cellular connection. Or at least there will be until the Feds weigh in on that one.

Space for five

Inside, the cabin is wide, and five adults should be able to travel in comfort.

2012 Tesla Model S beta vehicle, Fremont, CA, October 2011

2012 Tesla Model S beta vehicle, Fremont, CA, October 2011

Enlarge Photo

The front seats are supportive, the driving position is good, the controls are well-placed, and outward visibility is good to the front and sides–though the steeply angled rear window glass offers little more than a slit in the rear-view mirror.

The rear door openings are smaller than they look, and the windows slope inward as they rise toward the roof rail. That makes access to the rear seat more challenging than you might expect.

Once seated in the rear, outboard passengers will notice that that the cabin is wider at shoulder height than at head level and the rear seat back is angled a bit more steeply than customary.

Because the battery pack is in the floorpan, front and rear footwells aren’t as deep as they would be in a conventional luxury sedan.

This means rear passengers are seated in a more reclined, knees-up position than in cars like the Mercedes-Benz E-Class or BMW 5-Series. It’s not necessarily uncomfortable, but it’s noticeable.


2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

If the Model S has a sunroof fitted, a six-foot man sitting in the rear seat comes within a fraction of an inch of the headliner. But most adults should be comfortable riding in the rear over long distances.

Practical electric car for the family

Once you’re past the wow factor of the central touchscreen, the Model S interior is relatively plain and unadorned.

Soft-touch materials cover any surface an occupant might come into contact with, but there are fewer of the kinds of power accessories for passengers than the lengthy options list of competing cars offer. 

The total interior volume of the Tesla Model S is rated at 95.1 cubic feet. There’s 26.3 cubic feet of cargo space in the load bay with the rear seat up, a total of 58.1 cubic feet with the seat folded down, and another 5.3 cubic feet in the surprisingly large front trunk.

That makes it a practical family vehicle, in stark contrast to the subcompact interior of the Fisker Karma, with its absurdly tiny 6.9-cubic-foot trunk.

The early-production Model S cars appear to be well-built, at least after scanning four different models (serial numbers 106, 108, 111, and 116, for those who keep track).

About the biggest quality flaws we noticed among the four were a misaligned Velcro fastener patch on the front-trunk liner, and a recalcitrant rear shoulder-harness retractor.

Overall, A for effort

Overall, our early and brief impressions of the 2012 Tesla Model S are favorable.

It appears to be the first electric car that’s simultaneously good-looking, fully digital in the best tradition of Silicon Valley innovation, and requires very little compromise for around-town use.

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

2012 Tesla Model S, brief test drive, New York City, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

Whether it will become a viable distance traveler depends entirely on whether Tesla launches its much-discussed SuperCharger network of quick-charging stations.

And whether Tesla will become a viable independent car company depends on whether it can ramp up Model S production while keeping quality high, and continue to add digital features.

The company will also have to manage the inevitable tweaks, updates, or quality recalls graciously, swiftly, and decisively in a way that convinces customers they’re being taken care of by this audacious new carmaker.

The last car company started from scratch in the U.S. by entrepreneurs whose brand is still with us today was Chrysler, in 1924. Tesla still faces very, very long odds of survival.

But on first impression, it appears that they’ve at least gotten the product pretty much right.

Now the hard work begins.

+++++++++++

By John Voelcker

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV: First Drive Of Tesla-Powered Crossover

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012


2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

If the ideal electric car has a real-world range of 100 miles or more and the practical utility that American families buy crossovers for, the future may be arriving this year.

The 2012 Toyota RAV4 EV has every bit of space that the gasoline versions do. Its Tesla-engineered battery pack and electric motor give it better performance than the RAV4′s most powerful V-6 version, plus a real-world range of 100 or more miles (depending on how you use the climate control).

It’s too bad that the RAV4 EV will only be sold in California as a “compliance car,” in a limited run of just 2,600 over the next three model years.

In other words, even if you want one–and have the price of $49,800–you may not be able to buy one.

As electric-car advocates may remember, this is actually the second RAV4 EV. The first one was built a decade ago to comply with earlier California zero-emission vehicle mandates that were subsequently changed, so Toyota stopped building them.

There are still almost 500 of the 2002 Toyota RAV4 EVs running around California–we drove one a couple of years ago–and their owners have been waiting eagerly for the new 2012 model.

Developed in record time, with a deal between Toyota and Tesla announced in May 2010 by respective CEOs Akio Toyoda and Elon Musk, the 2012 RAV4 EV will go on sale later this year in select California markets.

Tesla battery and motor

Tesla Motors [NSDQ:TSLA] engineered the lithium-ion battery pack, which has 41.8 kilowatt-hours of usable capacity and sits below the floorpan.

Ground clearance is consequently reduced by a couple of inches, but the RAV4′s cargo space of 36.4 cubic feet is untouched–as is the rear-seat foot room.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

Tesla also provided the AC induction motor that powers the front wheels, which is the same unit used in the 2012 Tesla Model S electric sport sedan, but with a lower peak output of 115 kilowatts (limited not by the motor itself but by the pack power).

The drive motor, power electronics, and onboard battery charger are located under the hood where the engine and transmission used to sit.

Despite the loss of those items, the RAV4 EV is roughly 470 pounds heavier than a front-wheel drive RAV4 Limited with the V-6 engine, rising to roughly 4,030 pounds.

But it’s the power that really impresses when you drive the RAV4 EV, which more or less uses the powertrain and battery capacity of the lowest-spec Tesla Model S with a 40-kWh battery pack.

Toyota quotes less than 7 seconds from 0 to 60 mph in Sport mode and, more importantly–where it really counts in real-world usage–just 2.5 seconds to go from 30 to 50 mph. That’s notably faster than the best V-6 version.

Top speed is limited to 85 mph in Normal mode, and 100 mph in Sport mode.

User control: lots

As in Tesla vehicles, there are a number of user-controllable settings. There are normal and Sport drive modes, for instance, the latter boosting your acceleration even if you keep your foot steady when you push the Sport button while underway.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

Then there are three climate settings: Eco-High, Eco-Low, and Normal. The Normal setting essentially replicates the maximum-blast behavior of a gasoline car’s cooling and heating system–and it chews through range at a major rate.

Eco-Low moderates that, and Eco-High is the least powerful climate setting, providing the most range.

Toyota claimed that Eco-Low is enough to keep front-seat passengers comfortable, if not either chilly or toasty, on cold and hot days respectively.

We were skeptical, but in fact in California coastal weather up to the low 80s, that proved entirely true with the fan on a lower setting.

We didn’t have any chance to test the car in chilly Northeastern winter weather–but then, it won’t be sold there, so it’s somewhat academic.

From 93 to 112 miles of range

Perhaps the most significant aspect of the 2012 RAV4 EV, though, is its real-world range–courtesy of the relatively huge usable 42 kWh of the battery pack.

(By comparison, the 2012 Nissan Leaf has a maximum usable pack capacity of 20.4 kilowatt-hours, or half that number.)

In an afternoon of driving two different electric RAV4s, we concluded two things.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

First, it’s easy to get 100 to 115 miles of range no matter how you drive the car, in local stop-and-go or at legal freeway speeds and then some (given the general traffic flow in Southern California).

Second, the Tesla/Toyota range estimator on the RAV4 EV is remarkably accurate, with the change to projected range usually no more than 1 mile different than the actual mileage covered.

We didn’t run any of our test cars down near 0 range, but Toyota assured us that there’s a small margin even after the battery is shown as totally depleted.

Range of 158 miles, RLY?

Toyota estimates that in Normal charging mode–which doesn’t charge the battery pack to 100 percent–the RAV4 EV has a range of 93 miles.

If the owner needs more range and sets the electric RAV4 to “Extended Range” charging mode, that rises almost 20 percent, to 112 miles.

Despite lengthy conversations with the EPA, though, Toyota was not able to convince the agency to let it list two separate ranges–so it expects the EPA-rated range to come in around 98 miles.

Just for reference, with a fully charged pack and the ventilation turned completely off in one of our test vehicles, the range estimator said we had 158 miles. That’s worth opening some windows for.

The number fell to 92 when we touched the switch for Normal ventilation, rose to 111 on Eco-Low, and then 118 on Eco-High–which was where we left it.

10-kW charging

Unlike lesser battery electric cars whose onboard chargers are limited to 3.3 kilowatts (Nissan Leaf) or 6.6 kilowatts (Ford Focus Electric, Coda Sedan), the Tesla-designed charger in the RAV4 EV can charge at up to 10 kilowatts.



2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

That means owners will have a sufficiently beefy 240-Volt Level 2 charging station if they want to charge a fully discharged pack overnight.

Toyota has arranged with Leviton to offer a custom charging station that delivers 9.6 kW at 40 amps, which will give you a recharge time of just 6 hours for the full pack. The price starts at $1,590 including basic installation.

On the other end of the scale, charging at 110 Volts with the cord that comes standard under the rear deck is tortuous, with a full pack charge requiring far more than 24 hours.

The motto: Big packs require special charging stations–which may require you to rewire your garage first. You have been warned.

Good handling, not great

With the 840-pound battery pack as the lowest part of the vehicle, the handling of the Toyota RAV4 EV is good. Oddly, the lower center of gravity (as good as a sedan’s, Toyota says) makes the tall crossover seating position feel higher than in the conventional vehicle.

Toyota has re-weighted its electric power steering to give less assist on the highway and more assist at low speeds, where the extra weight demands it. The steering feel is less noticeably numb than on many other Toyota products, though there’s still not a lot of road feel available.

Overall, while the handling isn’t as well balanced as our all-time favorite crossover, the 2013 Mazda CX-5, it’s better than average for a compact crossover.

Affluent-family #WIN

The 2012 Toyota RAV4 EV has the potential to be the best and most practical battery electric vehicle sold in the U.S. south of Tesla’s luxury-priced Model S sedan range.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

While the 2012 Nissan Leaf offers 73 miles of EPA-rated range and sacrifices some portion of that at freeway speeds, the RAV4 EV apparently hits the magic 100-mile mark, if not quite the 120 miles that many plug-in advocates feel is the real sweet spot.

So now affluent, early adopter families can add an electric crossover to the list of plug-in cars to test-drive along with the Leaf, the Chevy Volt, and the Tesla Model S.

The electric RAV4 may also simply whet the market’s appetite for the upcoming 2014 Tesla Model X crossover, complete with “falcon doors” and its 60- or 85-kWh battery pack options.

Which is why it’s such a shame that so few of these will be built through the 2014 model year.

We understand why; such a development partnership was a shockingly new and challenging way of doing business for both companies.

Both Toyota and Tesla are proud companies with set ways of designing, validating, and engineering cars for production.

If you read between the lines when speaking to slightly tired-looking engineers, meshing those procedures in a single product team to get a car out the door in two and a half years was brutally hard.

Losing money on each one

More importantly, industry scuttlebutt suggests that Toyota is still likely losing $10,000 or more on each RAV4 EV it sells. After all, if your CEO tells you to co-develop a car with Tesla, what incentive does Tesla have to cut prices on its battery pack and other components?

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo

But Toyota is justifiably proud of the RAV4 EV, if still slightly shell-shocked at the birth process.

And 2,600 wealthy buyers who plunk down their $49,400 (before a Federal tax credit of $7,500 and California purchase rebate of $2,500) will be the beneficiaries.

Toyota hasn’t said whether it will offer a lease for the car, which it expects to go largely to retail buyers.

But given that the car may retain only 50 percent of its pack capacity over 5 to 8 years–largely depending on how it’s driven and charged–there’s an argument that a three-year lease might be about right.

Toyota warranties the battery pack for 8 years or 100,000 miles, but that simply ensures that if the pack fails, it is covered. The warranty specifically does not cover any loss of battery capacity.

Third generation to come?

Will there be a new 2016 model of the electric RAV4, given that the gasoline versions will be redesigned for 2014? (The electric version will continue with the older design after that happens, on the same lines.)

Toyota won’t say. The company does hint that it’ll be watching market reception of the RAV4 EV closely.

So if you want an electric crossover with 100 miles of real-world range and surprising acceleration that has all the cargo space of the regular RAV4, now’s your chance.

That’s your hint, folks.

Toyota provided airfare, lodging, and meals to enable High Gear Media to bring you this first-person test drive.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV, Newport Beach, California, July 2012

Enlarge Photo


+++++++++++

By John Voelcker