Tag archives for Pricing News

MT Poll: Is the $49,800 Toyota RAV4 EV Priced Right?

MT Poll: Is the $49,800 Toyota RAV4 EV Priced Right?

Lots of car doors open when you have $50,000 to spend. A 2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Laguna Seca and a base 2013 Porsche Boxster cost about $50,000, but if an electric-powered crossover is more your style, then you’ll also have enough to afford the Toyota RAV4 EV, set to go on sale later this summer with an asking price of $49,800, before credits.

2012 Toyota RAV4 EV instrument panel 300x187 imageIs that asking too much? Toyota doesn’t think so. Ed Larocque, Toyota USA’s national marketing manager for advanced technology vehicles, defended the RAV4 EV’s price point to WardsAuto: “All things considered, [including] what you’re getting with the product, we think it’s priced right for the market in California.” Following the initial launch in California, Toyota will decide what U.S. markets will get the RAV4 EV.

The RAV4 EV includes a powertrain developed with Tesla Motors. Toyota claims it will accelerate from 0-60 mph in 7.0 seconds in sport mode and 8.6 seconds in normal mode, while reaching a top speed of 100 mph. Its lithium-ion battery pack will need about 6 hours to charge (level 2, 240V), providing a range of 92-113 miles, depending on driving modes and conditions. Standard creature comforts include navigation, heated front seats, and seating surfaces wrapped in Toyota’s new Neutron fabric.

Last but not least are the tax credits. Combining the federal tax credit of $7500 with California’s $2500 credit and the RAV4 EV’s price was knocked down to about $39,990. By comparison, the all-electric Nissan Leaf hatchback is $36,050 (before credits), while a fully loaded 2012 RAV4 Limited AWD V-6 is priced at $32,820.

Source: WardsAuto, Toyota

By Erick Ayapana

Tesla Model S Prices Bumped by $2500 to $59,900, Battery Replacement Costs $8000-$12,000

Tesla Model S Prices Bumped by $2500 to $59,900, Battery Replacement Costs $8000-$12,000

Tesla has opened up about the Model S four-door’s recently announced price bumps: for all reservations placed after the end of 2012, Tesla Model S prices will increase by $2500. Before federal tax credits, that means the 40 kW-hr model will now cost $59,900, add $10,000 for the 60 kW-hr model and $20,000 for the 85 kW-hr model, while the 85 kW-hr Performance model will carry an MSRP of $94,900.

Tesla Model S profile red1 300x187 imageAll Tesla Model S cars with the revised pricing will add as standard equipment 12-way power seats and heated front seats. At a constant 55 mph, Tesla estimates the ranges of the three different motor choices at 160, 230, 300 miles. Claimed acceleration from 0-60 mph times take from 4.4 to 6.5 seconds, though we tested a Performance model completing the sprint in 3.9 seconds.

Tesla notes that the $2500 price increase is half the rate of inflation, and with plenty of press — it was the Motor Trend 2013 Car of the Year, after all — luxury customers may still be willing to pay the premium. Speaking of premiums, Tesla is also offering a four-year/50,000-mile extended warranty above the car’s standard four-year/50,000-mile basic warranty.

The automaker has also revealed pricing for battery replacements. Taking the mystery out of the one maintenance detail that scares many about electric cars, Tesla says that $8000 will buy 40 kW-hr Model S customers a new battery to be installed at any time after the eighth year of ownership. The cost rises to $10,000 for the 60 kW-hr battery and $12,000 for the 85 kW-hr battery.

Those battery replacement option prices cover the battery and all installation labor and parts needed to make a Model S whole again. Customers who don’t select the option at time of order will have up to 90 days from date of delivery to choose it, and the prepaid battery will apply to second and subsequent owners even if the original owner sells their car. And while it states the fresh battery reprieve comes after the magic 8-year mark, there “will likely be economic outcomes (incentives or drawbacks) tied to early or late exercise options,” per a Tesla spokesperson.

Considering Tesla’s vehicle servicing strategy, we had to ask if a mobile battery swap was foreseeable in the year 2020. Representatives seemed amused by our image of an electric-powered box truck with enclosed lift being the 2020 version of the electric-car maker’s Service Ranger, but it appears the B&M route is the safe bet for the time being.

Read more about the Tesla Model S in our First Test and Range Verification article.

Source: Tesla

Benson Kong contributed to this post.

By Zach Gale

Tesla Confirms Plans to Increase Model S Prices

Tesla Confirms Plans to Increase Model S Prices

The price of a Tesla Model S will be increasing soon — but the company hasn’t yet disclosed by how much prices will rise. However, Tesla did confirm that some features that were previously standard on the Model S will become paid options.

The Tesla Model S is an all-electric sedan built in California by billionaire visionary Elon Musk. The car is Motor Trend’s 2013 Car of the Year. Prices currently range from $57,400 for an entry model with a 40-kWh battery pack (before any tax rebates), to $105,400 for the loaded Signature Performance model with an 85-kWh battery.

Tesla Model S interior1 300x187 imageTesla confirmed in a blog post that it will raise prices on the cars in the near future, but noted that customers who have already placed a reservation for the electric car won’t have to pay the higher price. Musk mentioned in August that over 12,000 people had placed a $5000 deposit for a Model S. Only customers who order after the price increases take effect will be locked into the higher prices.

When the price increases take effect, Tesla may also reorganize the car’s equipment list. Tesla warns that some items that are currently standard on the Model S may become paid options. That could mean a double-whammy when prices increase, as customers must not only pay a higher entry price, but must also cough up extra for features that used to be included for free.

It’s unclear why Tesla plans to increase Model S prices so early in the car’s production run. The decision could be important to increase profitability on the electric sedan, or could be a reflection of higher than anticipated customer demand. But raising prices would seem unlikely to help Tesla reach its publicly stated goal of selling 20,000 cars in 2013.

Tesla’s blog post says the company will announce the new prices and options lists within two to three weeks.

Sources: Tesla, Forbes

By Jake Holmes

Repriced: Tesla Model S MSRPs Jump By $2500, Battery Replacement Costs Revealed – Rumor Central

Repriced: Tesla Model S MSRPs Jump By $2500, Battery Replacement Costs Revealed

If you’re considering a Tesla Model S, now would be a wise time to place your order. The EV automaker has just announced that all reservations placed after the end of this year are subject to a price increase of $2500. The 40 kW-hr Model S, for example, will jump to $59,900. The 60 and 85 kW-hr models will cost $10,000 and $20,000 more respectively. The range-topping 85 kW-hr Performance model will carry a $94,900 price tag.

All Tesla Model S cars with the revised pricing will add as standard equipment 12-way power seats and heated front seats. At a constant 55 mph, Tesla estimates the ranges of the three different motor choices at 160, 230, 300 miles. Claimed acceleration from 0-60 mph times take from 4.4 to 6.5 seconds, though we tested a Performance model completing the sprint in 3.9 seconds.

Tesla notes that the $2500 price increase is half the rate of inflation, and with plenty of press — it was the 2013 Automobile of the Year, after all — luxury customers may still be willing to pay the premium. Speaking of premiums, Tesla is also offering a four-year/50,000-mile extended warranty above the car’s standard four-year/50,000-mile basic warranty.

The automaker has also revealed pricing for battery replacements. Taking the mystery out of the one maintenance detail that scares many about electric cars, Tesla says that $8000 will buy 40 kW-hr Model S customers a new battery to be installed at any time after the eighth year of ownership. The cost rises to $10,000 for the 60 kW-hr battery and $12,000 for the 85 kW-hr battery.

Those battery replacement option prices cover the battery and all installation labor and parts needed to make a Model S whole again. Customers who don’t select the option at time of order will have up to 90 days from date of delivery to choose it, and the prepaid battery will apply to second and subsequent owners even if the original owner sells their car. And while it states the fresh battery reprieve comes after the magic 8-year mark, there “will likely be economic outcomes (incentives or drawbacks) tied to early or late exercise options,” per a Tesla spokesperson.

Considering Tesla’s vehicle servicing strategy, we asked if a mobile battery swap was foreseeable in the year 2020. Representatives seemed amused by our image of an electric-powered box truck with enclosed lift being the 2020 version of the electric-car maker’s Service Ranger, but it appears the B&M route is the safest bet for now.

Source: Tesla

Benson Kong contributed to this post.





By Zach Gale

Priced: 2012 Tesla Model S to Start at $49,900, Arrives Next Summer

Priced: 2012 Tesla Model S to Start at $49,900, Arrives Next Summer

Tesla today announced that the 2012 Tesla Model S, due to launch next year, will indeed carry a base price of $49,900 following federal tax credits. The electric carmaker released the pricing news on its Web site in part to quell rumors that the all-electric sedan for every man — or at least every relatively well off man – might cost more than initially expected.

The price applies to the base model Model S, which will be equipped with the 40 kWh battery, which will boast an impressive estimated range of 160 miles on a single charge and a claimed 0-60 mph time of 6.5 seconds, according to Tesla. Standard equipment includes an impressive, huge 17-inch touchscreen infotainment system and the Model S rolls on 19-inch wheels. But before the base Model S arrives next winter, Tesla is rolling out its  more expensive variants featuring bigger battery packs and extended range.

First on the production schedule is the Model S equipped with the 85 kWh battery, which will go on sale next summer with a price of $69,900 (after federal tax credits); it is expected to have a range of 300 miles. Model S sedans equipped with the 65 kWh battery pack will follow three-months later and should be able to travel 230 miles on a single charge; price is set at $59,900. Finally, a performance model fitted with the 85 kWh battery pack will cost $79,900. Tesla is estimating a 0-to-60 mph time of just 4.4 seconds for the top performer of the Model S bunch.

Tesla has also launched a dedicated website for the Model S, neatly laying out all the pricing, specs, and options. The rear facing seats, for example, will increase passenger capacity to seven and will set you back $1,500, as will the available panoramic roof. The site also includes information on the number of charging options that will be offered with the Model S.

Source: Tesla

By Erick Ayapana