Tag archives for tesla model s

Tesla Model S Controversy: Who's Really At Fault?

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The conflict between the New York Times and Tesla Motors over a stranded Tesla Model Sis getting complicated.

The row started after reporter John M. Broderreviewed the cold weather, long distance driving capabilities of the Model S. In his article on the Times’ Automobiles section, Broder remarks that the vehicle went dead after only 185 miles, 80 miles less than its EPA estimated range of 265 miles per battery charge. Broder went on to blame the lithium-ion battery, which are reported to have problems holding charges in lower temperatures. Coming from a prominent publication such as the Times, this mostly negative review was a significant blow for Tesla, causing the company’s stock to dip. Tesla CEO Elon Musk reacted with a scathing series of rebuttal tweets, providing screenshots of contrasting data logs from the reviewed Model S’ computer, and calling Broder’s review completely “fake.”

So, who is actually wrong here?

According to both Tesla and Broder, Tesla provided specific instructions on how to drive the Model S for 200 miles between supercharging stations; namely, to keep the speedometer at 55 mph and minimize use of the battery-draining climate control. Broder states that he complied with Tesla’s requirements — setting the cruise control at 54 mph and turning down the heat despite the chilly temps. However, 29 miles from the Norwich, Connecticut charging station, he claims the Model S was “limping along at 45 mph” before it came to a complete halt five miles short of the station.

However, Musk argues that the car’s logs prove a different story. According to Musk and Tesla, the data indicates that Broder drove between 65 to 81 mph, never reaching the 45 mph snail’s pace he claimed. Also, the cabin was kept at a comfortable 72 degrees, even increased to 74 degrees at a later point in the trip. Musk also remarks that Broder did not fully charge the vehicle during any of his three charging station visits, even disconnecting the Model S when it showed an expected range of 32 miles, when Broder planned to drive 61 miles.

Today, the Atlantic Wire is questioning the validity of the logs provided by Musk and Tesla Motors. In a blog post published this morning, Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan tried to reach Elon Musk for comment on these accusations, as well as a request to “open source the driving logs” and other data. Musk was unavailable at the time.

Wanting to be an alleviator of our gas guzzling ways, utilitarianism has been one of Tesla’s main goals. Wired contributor and EV1 engineer Chelsea Sexton remarks, “The day-to-day experience EVs offer is so much better than gas cars for 95% of driving. Long-distance road trips are among the last 5% of usage scenarios.”

Ironically, it was a little over a century ago that this circumstance was reversed. Steam and electric cars that appeared at the beginning of the automobile age outsold all petrol-powered vehicles, until combustion engines became more stable and gas became more abundant for long distance trips. Now, at its resurgence, the electric vehicle has to face a similar challenge as its early gas-fueled cousins.

Even if Broder’s review turns out to be false, Tesla Motors may have already shot itself in the foot. What perhaps is most intriguing about this fiasco was the amount of care required (not merely recommended) by Tesla in order to drive the Model S the 500 miles it initially logged. By just taking this into consideration, Broder correctly reports that Tesla billing the Model S as a “casual car” ready for a road trip is a bit of a stretch. If the typical road-tripping consumer needs as much detailed instruction as seen in both Tesla and Broder’s account, the extinction of the gas-powered car might be a little further off.

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By Jessica Matsumoto

Tesla Model S Adds Optional $6,500 Performance Package Plus

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Tesla Motors has set out to prove that their Model S is not just a great electric car, but a great car, period, since it hit the market. They’ve taken the next step with today’s announcement that a new handling setup with summer tires, called the Performance Package Plus, will be available for $6,500.

Tesla says the package will bring “supercar handling” to the Model S, which is a frightening thought for any other sub-$100,000 luxury sedan on the market. The Model S has already proven itself to have impressive acceleration and is obviously loaded with tech. Plus, nearly a year after its release there haven’t been any major issues with its futuristic powertrain. Will a new handling package elevate the Model S even further in the minds of luxury buyers?

Available only on the top 85kWh Performance trim, the Performance Package Plus includes 21-inch Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 tires and improvements to the suspension dampers, bushings and anti-roll bars. Normally, the 85kWh Model S offers 19-inch all-season tires or optional 21-inch Continental ExtremeContact DW tires – the PS2 set will provide a noticeable improvement.

The advantages don’t boil down exclusively to the handling, though. Tesla also says that the Performance Package Plus will increase the driving range of the Model S. Somehow, the setup that will help the Model S attack hairpin turns will also take it from 265 miles to 277 miles on a single charge.

We’re patiently waiting for more information to come out on the new package, and can’t wait to test it out for ourselves. The Model S has been a smashing sales success thus far, already besting the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt, and this new setup could convert the last remaining non-believers.

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By Ryan ZumMallen

Tesla Unveils New Leasing Program For Model S

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In an attempt to diversify purchasing options for potential customers, Tesla Motors yesterday unveiled a new 36-month leasing program for the popular Model S electric sedan that partners with banks and includes several key promises in the hopes of easing public fears about the cost of ownership.

So, how much? For the 60kWh Model S, only about $500 per month. Oh, excuse me. That’s if you factor in down payments, federal incentives, a guaranteed resale value, business write-offs, and gas savings. If that sounds like a lot of qualifiers, it is. The true out-of-pocket monthly payment is over $1,000 per month ($1,097 when I input figures that would relate to my hypothetical purchase — try it yourself here). Tesla shouldn’t be faulted for offering an alternative ownership method, but they do deserve scrutiny for skewing the numbers a bit. Then again, maybe this does turn out to be quite the deal. Does it make you more interested in buying a Model S?

After all, the Tesla Model S is not an affordable car. Nor should it be. The five seater is bloody gorgeous, blasts from 0-60 mph in about five seconds and has an all-electric range of more than 230 miles (up to 300 miles in some trims). It isn’t the car of the future, but it will probably lead to the car of the future, and that shouldn’t come cheap.

The problem is that Tesla wants to build the everyman electric car, but you can’t do that by making an expensive car appear affordable. They’ve already killed plans for the cheaper 40 kWh Model S, citing low interest, so why not just embrace that the Model S is an expensive car for people with the means?

Instead, Tesla is trying to put a price on things like gas savings and time savings and factor them into your monthly payment. Those benefits of owning a Tesla Model S are all well and good, but if I’m on the fence about buying one, they aren’t going to open my eyes and lead me down a new path. I already know about the benefits of a Model S or I wouldn’t be considering one in the first place. The Model S is a great choice for people who can afford one, but asking them to consider hypothetical pennies saved doesn’t seem like a great marketing strategy.

Which is a shame, because the lease offer is attractive. US Bank and Wells Fargo put up 10% for a down payment, which depending on your state is likely covered by tax credits anyway, and after the 36-month term your Model S will have the guaranteed resale value of a Mercedes-Benz S Class.

It’s not a bad deal. It’s just not the deal Tesla wants you to think it is.

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By Ryan ZumMallen