Tesla Motors Inc. boss Elon Musk has accused a New York Times reporter of faking a Model S road test and claiming the electric automaker is misreporting the vehicle's estimated driving range.

To give you a glimpse of the background, New York Times' Tesla Model S review that was published last week said the car got around 200 miles on a single charge, instead of the 265 mile range advertised by the EV company.

It didn't take too much for Elon Musk to respond, the Tesla CEO calling the New York Times story a fake and slamming the writer's report in an interview with Bloomberg.

"[...] He then took an unplanned detour through downtown Manhattan, through heavy traffic, instead of going on the interstate to the charging station. He also exceeded the speed limit quite substantially, which decreased his range. If you do all those three things, which we were clear should not be done and obviously common sense suggests should not be done, then you will not be able to go as far," said Musk.

To back up his claims, Tesla's boss threatens to publish official telemetry data that proves that the New York Times didn't used the car according to its user manual.

For those who don't know, each Tesla vehicle has the option of logging data such as speed and GPS coordinates. While this is only enabled at the owners request, the reviewers' cars are always coming with active logging that transfers all the data directly to Tesla.

New York Times denied any of Musk's accusations, so now we'll just have to wait for that official telemetry blog post to arrive to find out who's right in this year's biggest automotive scandal yet.

By Ciprian Florea